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Thursday, June 18th, 2009
7:31a - Main Gap Plugged


And the sad saga continues. J. tried to pick up handles for the post hole digger at Chariton, but they did not have handles. They did not even have jobbers at all.

The same company has outlets in Centerville and Promise City, so I asked J. to have them call down to see if anyone else had them in stock.

He was already on his way when he called. I never get to eat what I've cooked without the phone ringing, so his was the second interruption. My potatoes were slightly black on one side and had a charred taste in places, so I finished my lunch before heading down to see if Lockridge carried them in Promise City, only a 12 mile round trip, as opposed to a 50 mile jaunt.

Before I got done, J. was there. Now, it takes me 30 minutes to get home from Chariton... I called, and yes, Promise City had both handles and jobbers. I asked J. which he thought would be better. J. said he needed the bolts, too, because the ones holding the old handles on were rusted and he'd have to break them off to replace the handles. I asked J. which he thought would be better, envisioning him being unable to get the new handles on (or, more accurately, the old ones off).

"Do you just want me to go with you?"

"Why don't you just go and charge them to me?"

Soon he was back with brand new $40 jobbers with fiberglass handles. They did the trick.

So, the fence was fixed?

Dream on! We only had two screws long enough to reach into the post. I know we bought a whole box, and think over half of them ought to be left, but they were nowhere to be found.

"Check the drill bits, too."

Back to Lockridge he goes, getting a second brand new drill bit in addition to the one that came "free" in the screw package. Both batteries to the drill are freshly charged.

By now, the heat of the day is at its peak. He comes in, red-faced, and rests, drinking copious amounts of very necessary water.

"He didn't last long outdoors," I think as he re-enters, feeling sorry for him working during the hottest part of the day. But no. One battery is dead, the other dying. He plops the dead one on the charger, chugs some more water, and heads back out. Soon he's back again. The other battery died.

"It's really hot in here." Water is still running off his face.

"Only if you've been working. If you are sedentary for a while, it gets cold, especially if you are right in front of one of the vents."

"I could just fall asleep."

It takes nearly an hour for the first battery to charge. I am glad. His face gets clear back to normal coloration before that happens.

By seven, the fence is back together, supper eaten, and while I am on a phone call, he bows out, signaling he'll do the fence post with the gate supports maybe this weekend.

So, NO is still not out on grass again. J. reports that there are three more posts along the creek fence that are rotting off at ground level, and should the horses push strongly on it (as in, stallion on one side, mare in heat on the other) it could break again.

The front field needs to be left vacant for a bit to let it recuperate, which means the corner post that should hold the gate has to work as well. I suggested drilling the holes for the bolts in the wood before carting it impossibly far from electricity and needing to use a hand drill to bore it out.

Maybe this weekend, J. said.


current mood: ready for bed

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